TP-Link AC1750 vs. CenturyLink Fiber

I’ve spent a few hours figuring this out, so I thought I share my experience.

The background story: We have a bunch of wireless devices at home. Unfortunately the router is placed at one end of the house and the signal strength at the other end is mediocre or poor. So I’ve bought a claimed to be good but affordable TP-Link AC1750 on Amazon. I thought it would be easy. Well it is not rocket science if you know what to do, so here it is:

  1. Before doing anything get your PPPoE username and password. The username is usually seen in the existing router configuration. You need to call the CenturyLink Tech support for the password.
  2. Replace the old router with the new one. Make sure you are using the same LAN port which the old one used on the Fiber modem. Other ports won’t work.
  3. Connect to the router’s network. Go to the TP-Link AC1750 management console.
    By default: http://192.168.0.1/  (admin/admin)
  4. Network – WAN Settings:
    1. WAN Connection Type: PPPoE/ Russian PPPoE
    2. PPPoE Connection: Type the previously acquired username and password for PPPoE
    3. Secondary Connection: Disabled
    4. Tap on advanced button
    5. Set MTU Size to 1492
      Without this the speed of connection would be a bit slower and flaky.
    6. Save
  5. Network – IPTV Settings: (This part is important even if you do not have IPTV)
    1. Make sure that IGMP Proxy is enabled
    2. Set the mode: 802.1Q Tag VLAN
    3. VLAN Tag for Internet Service: enabled
    4. Internet VLAN ID: 201
    5. I do not have IPTV or other service so I do not know the other settings. I set all 4 LAN ports to Internet
    6. Save
  6. If you reboot your modem now it shall be able to connect to the internet.

Enabling IPv6

It is important to me to able to communicate with the IPV6 network, as IPv6 is going to be more and more common and I need to test and do some work with it.

CenturyLink provides IPv6 6RD and Tunnel 6to4 type of IPv6 connections. Well IPv6 6RD id unfortunately not supported by this TP-Link router, here are the steps how to get Tunnel 6to4 to work:

  1. Go to your router management console:
  2. IPv6 Support / IPv6 Setup
  3. Enable IPv6
  4. WAN Connection Type: Tunnel 6to4
  5. Set the MTU Size to: 1492
  6. In the LAN settings set IPv6 Address Assign Type to DHCPv6 Server
    However SLAAC works for most devices, some devices like SmartTV-s need DHCPv6 Server in order to be able to connect to the Internet with IPv6
  7. Save
  8. Reboot Router

 

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2 Responses to TP-Link AC1750 vs. CenturyLink Fiber

  1. JoeyjojoJr Shabadoo says:

    I’m planning on doing the same thing with the same router. Getting CenturyLink Fiber at end of month. Couple questions. 1. Is it still working out O.K. with the AC1750 as the main router? 2. If you have the 1GB plan, is the throughput pretty reliable and close to 800+? 3. Did you return the “rental modem” (which is just a router from what I’ve read) and did you have any issues with this? 4. Have you had any hassles or run-arounds if your service went down and Century-Link makes it difficult because you are using your own router and not the supplied one? Thanks in advance for answering any of these questions.

    Like

    • lkishalmi says:

      Well, I had no option to give back the rental modem in the first year of the contract (they might change that policy with their new policies). There are two devices provided, one which does the optical -> ethernet conversion. It had 5 ports, but only the first one worked. The other one is a pretty standard NetGear WiFi/LAN router. I just replaced the later one.
      I had only 40 Mb/s speed subscription. I had no problem with the Service or support, they were helpful even though I just asked for the credentials for the connection.
      I had to move and use a different service provider now. I’ve replaced my router firmware to dd-wrt just a week ago because it was unstable and had to reboot every 2-3 days.

      Like

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